Totally Bemused

Feb 17, 2014

tubesock:

switchtre:

Selfie

did this bastard seriously just take a picture of himself mid bennett grind?

tubesock:

switchtre:

Selfie

did this bastard seriously just take a picture of himself mid bennett grind?

(Source: pqp-tiago, via awhalegavebirthtoaroaringtrex)

Feb 17, 2014

mementomoriiv:

Kitty Valentine - A.B.C.

mementomoriiv:

Kitty Valentine - A.B.C.

Feb 17, 2014

catsareassholes:

this is the laziest fucking gang I’ve ever seen
http://livedoor.4.blogimg.jp/dqnplus/imgs/7/3/73ca38e1.jpg

catsareassholes:

this is the laziest fucking gang I’ve ever seen

(Source: halfdry, via safesexandkittens)

Feb 16, 2014

(Source: wingedmind, via majestic-dork)

Feb 16, 2014

onlylolgifs:

How far prosthetics have come http://lolgifs.net

onlylolgifs:

How far prosthetics have come

(via majestic-dork)

Feb 16, 2014

(Source: cute-overload, via fuckyeahdinoart)

Feb 16, 2014

kadrey:

The corpse in the floor.

kadrey:

The corpse in the floor.

(Source: heptagram)

Feb 16, 2014

Feb 16, 2014

Above is an excerpt from ‘Personhood’ by Lauren Zuniga, which can  be viewed here

(Source: vvayvvardson, via wilwheaton)

Feb 15, 2014

princesslibrarian:

you think you’re a better kisser than me??? you think you’re a better cuddler? come over here and prove it punk

(via awhalegavebirthtoaroaringtrex)

Feb 15, 2014

archiemcphee:

These intricate and extraordinarily beautiful embroidered silk balls are a form of Japanese folk art called Temari, which means “hand ball” in Japanese. These particular temari are even more impressive because they were handmade by a 92-year-old grandmother in Japan.

"Although she only learned this elaborate skill in her sixties, she has since created nearly 500 unique designs that have been photographed by her granddaughter NanaAkua. Impressive does not even begin to describe this feat of dexterity, imagination and keen eyesight. The difficult process of becoming a recognized temari craftsman in Japan is tedious and requires specific training and testing. This grandmother must certainly be one motivated and talented woman. And if that was not enough to garner your complete admiration, she now volunteers every week teaching others how to make their own temari.”

Temari have been made in Japan since the 7th century and are still highly valued and cherished as gifts symbolizing deep friendship and loyalty. They are traditionally given to children by their parents on New Year’s Day. Mothers place a small piece of paper with a secret goodwill wish for her child inside the tightly-wrapped ball. Alternately, some temari are made as noisemakers by placing rice grains or bells in the center.

Visit My Modern Metropolis to view more of NanaAkua’s photos of her grandmother’s beautiful handiwork and learn more about this stunning Japanese holiday tradition.

(via mementomoriiv)

Feb 15, 2014

(Source: hatsandanimals, via trash-pile)

Feb 15, 2014

tastefullyoffensive:

[krys1202]

tastefullyoffensive:

[krys1202]

Feb 15, 2014

did-you-kno:

Source http://didyouknowblog.com

did-you-kno:

Source

(via majestic-dork)

Feb 15, 2014